Course Structure and Design

Each course in the Doctor of Education in Community College Leadership Program (Ed. D. CCLP) is designed to provide clear learning objectives and relevant assessments aligned with course and program competencies, quality instruction and interaction, timely and pertinent instructional materials, student achievement of learning outcomes, and instructor flexibility with the practitioner in mind.

The learning objectives, assessments, course textbooks, and required readings are retained within each course.  However, instructors are encouraged to identify supplemental community college-related readings and to incorporate distinctiveness in instructional methodology in how courses are ultimately delivered (e.g., combining sessions for each of one to three face-to-face weekends to achieve maximum student-faculty engagement, combining face-to-face and technology-assisted instruction, including site visits for analysis) as long as quality instruction, engagement, and student learning outcome attainment are maintained.

Syllabi and other designated materials are available online (e.g., video clips, power point presentations, linked resources and publications) to provide ready access to materials and contribute to student and faculty interaction.

Doctor of Education in Community College Leadership Program (Ed. D. CCLP) Course Descriptions:  

This course offers students the opportunity to identify and analyze emerging local, state, national, and global issues impacting community colleges in the context of the historical development of the community college and the events that shaped its evolving mission.
The Leadership Development course provides an introduction to individual, interpersonal, group, and organizational leadership theory, and includes practical applications. Because the field of leadership behavior is emerging and continues to grow, relevant concepts, models, and theories come from a variety of research studies and case studies. A summer residency will convene during which students will take a leadership self assessment and meet with community college leaders to discuss leadership issues.
Leaders at all levels of the organization must become adept at responding to rapid and systematic change in the coming decades. "Managing Change: Leading Institutional Transformation" provides students with an introduction to principles of managing change in community colleges within the real context of change and institutional transformation efforts. The course includes the practical application of principles to complex change processes and working with individuals, teams, and organizations to lead institutional transformation.
This course is designed to compare traditional organizations developed for production and manufacturing (e.g., Taylor and hierarchical structures) with contemporary models that have evolved (e.g., virtual organizations that include open systems with continuous learning, involvement, and information transfer).  The course will provide relevant practical experience for applying theory pertaining to organization design and development issues related to secondary to postsecondary education and career transitions, with opportunities for team planning, presentations, and analytical reports.
The purpose of this course is to help students become aware of ethical issues confronting community college leaders and educational value choices (e.g. access, quality education, accountability, efficiency  equity, completion); and, to systematically apply theory and morality lenses to the analysis of real-world issues through case studies of leadership and board issues, writing, team discussions, and reflection.
This course addresses the respective roles of community college trustees, CEOs, faculty, and other stakeholders; the principles and practices of good governance; the use of data, inquiry, and stakeholder involvement to inform policy/decision making and improve effectiveness.  Doctoral students will be exposed to current issues and leadership strategies pertaining to governance and administration.  Learning experiences will include a combination of face-to-face instructor-facilitated sessions, attendance at college board and executive team meetings, teleconferences and interaction with nationally-renowned speakers, structured team interaction, and college/district analyses and report and/or case study writing.
The course will address the elements of strategic and master planning, resource allocation, funding issues, and resource development through analyses of college or system case studies, group projects and presentations that are tailored to explore critical issues at the college or district level.  Students will be exposed to aligning mission, strategic plan, goals, budget and resource development endeavors.
This course is about the politics of higher education, educational agencies, and educational institutions. The course focuses on six key ideas that are central to political thought, policy and public affairs. It applies these ideas to contemporary and historical cases in order to develop students’ understanding, analytic skill, and capacity for effective action in leading higher education institutions. The six key ideas are: (1) Politics as a means for transforming individual interests into collective goods; (2) Institutions as the expression of political interests in society and as incentives that structure individual and group behavior; (3) Policy as an expression of collective interests, and policymaking as a process for aggregating and shaping individual and group interests; (4) Power as it is constructed in political relationships and expressed in institutions and political processes; (5) Public affairs as a process in shaping individual and group behavior; and (6) Analysis as a deliberative, data-driven decision making process.
Students will learn how to present, analyze, and interpret institutional data; and, communicate about and apply data for decision making at the institutional, program, and course levels. They will be asked to identify barriers to institutional effectiveness, student learning, equity, success, and completion. Students will work in teams to: analyze identified gaps and drop out/ or "leakage points" – based on data – in student progression and achievement at their home institutions; evaluate the effectiveness of a current intervention strategy; and assess the institutional culture for fostering a culture of evidence and inquiry. Students will learn about the use of data for strategic planning, policy development, and resource allocation. They will be required to write team reports and make team presentations for improving student outcomes. 
This course is designed to provide students an understanding of the characteristics of the contemporary community college student. It draws upon a broad range of research documenting the experiences of the diverse student populations in the American community college. This course provides an overview of theories, research, practices and other issues relevant to creating institutional environments for college success.
This course is designed to present the major research approaches in education, including inherent assumptions, key concepts, and central procedures associated with research approaches.  Through a combined focus on qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods research perspectives, students will gain a broad understanding of the diversity of research approaches in the field of education.  Students will apply their understanding of these fundamentals to the critical interpretation of the design and conduct of educational research and educational research reports. The course will also provide a foundation for further specialized study in research methods by offering multiple opportunities for students to collaborate in authentic research activities.  It is the intention of this course, as others in the program, that both a theoretical and practical interpretation of research is achieved by the students in this class.  These research activities will encourage students to apply material from course readings and class discussions to the issues that are endemic to community colleges.
This course provides an immersion in scholarly inquiry for students to identify and further explore quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methodologies for application in their dissertation  Students will discuss when to use different kinds of research, how to frame research questions, and formulate and refine initial thoughts on dissertation development.  Through supervised research and writing, students will learn about and prepare for the rigor involved in proposing to committee members in the third year of the program. By the end of the course, students will have: affirmed the dissertation topic and initial questions; developed a dissertation outline, initial literature review; drafted a dissertation prospectus; become familiar with IRB policies and procedures; and initiated committee member identification.

The capstone is designed to build upon the knowledge gleaned from previous courses. This is a capstone course designed to integrate concepts, theories, and skills learned in other graduate core courses. Students will learn what is involved in developing a constituency base and garnering its support to foster and improve strategic partnerships, college readiness and success, resource development, community services, economic and workforce development, and other priorities of the college.  Students will be asked to identify and develop plans and strategic communications for engaging internal and external stakeholders who are critical to achieving targeted goals.

Students will work in teams to develop executive reports and presentations.  These are to include in-depth institutional analyses of complex issues, and provide recommendations for systemic improvements, such as, how to: address identified silos (e.g., Academic Affairs, Student Support, Financial Services) and barriers (e.g., policy, practice, culture); integrate major initiatives; develop career pathways;  align curricula and assessments; foster partnerships to achieve identified goals; contribute to leadership and board development aligned with mission and goals; and foster institutional transformation to improve targeted outcomes.

The Practicum is a critical aspect of the doctoral students’ experience.  It offers an opportunity for students to spend time with a CEO or leadership team at a designated college or system office to examine a significant problem, with structured and supervised deliverables.  Students will be required to develop plans for their own learning outcomes for the practicum which will culminate in a comprehensive project or report for the college, the focus of which will be developed by the doctoral student with approval by the CEO and the course instructor.  The Practicum will normally be taken in the third year of studies following completion of core courses.  At this juncture, students will be immersed in identifying significant practical issues to be addressed in their dissertation, developing and refining their dissertation proposals, and drawing from learning experiences and information gleaned throughout the program.
The Practicum is a critical aspect of the doctoral students’ experience.  It offers an opportunity for students to spend time with a CEO or leadership team at a designated college or system office to examine a significant problem, with structured and supervised deliverables.  Students will be required to develop plans for their own learning outcomes for the practicum which will culminate in a comprehensive project or report for the college, the focus of which will be developed by the doctoral student with approval by the CEO and the course instructor.  The Practicum will normally be taken in the third year of studies following completion of core courses.  At this juncture, students will be immersed in identifying significant practical issues to be addressed in their dissertation, developing and refining their dissertation proposals, and drawing from learning experiences and information gleaned throughout the program.
The culmination of the CCLP is a summer residency, an opportunity for cohorts to convene at a location for a week to attend the Advanced Leadership Institute (ALI).  The ALI provides a time to reflect on many of the topics that have been covered during their doctoral studies and to help formulate final thoughts for the practicum and dissertation research.
The primary goal of this course is for the student to develop a proposal of the key elements of the dissertation to be used as a roadmap to guide the dissertation.  Successful completion of the course will require the approval of the proposal by the Dissertation Chair and the Dissertation Committee.
Students whose proposals have been approved are required to enroll in this course each trimester to work with the Dissertation Chair and Committee on a continuing basis until the final dissertation has been completed and approved.